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The Best Attractions In Croatia

Diocletian's Palace L K
Dubrovnik Boat Rentals Denis Rakigjija
Plitvice Lakes National Park Sergey Kovalenko
Vidova Gora Petar Rožić
Island of Lokrum Severin Sabahi
Sveta Nedilja Mateja Medved
Given2Fly Adventures Given2Fly Adventures
Amphitheatre de Pula Man Kit Hung
Goli Otok Ljiljana Jagodić
Morske Orgulje (Sea Organ) Morske orgulje
Galerija Mestrovic Galerija Meštrović
Krka National Park Andrzej Meres
Croatia , officially the Republic of Croatia is a country at the crossroads of Central and Southeast Europe, on the Adriatic Sea. Its capital Zagreb forms one of the country's primary subdivisions, along with twenty counties. Croatia has an area of 56,594 square kilometres and a population of 4.28 million, most of whom are Roman Catholics. The Croats arrived in the area in the 6th century and organised the territory into two duchies by the 9th century. Tomislav became the first king by 925, elevating Croatia to the status of a kingdom, which retained its sovereignty for nearly two centuries, reaching its peak during the rule of kings Petar Krešimir IV...
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The Best Attractions In Croatia

  • 1. Diocletian's Palace Split
    Diocletian's Palace is an ancient palace built for the Roman Emperor Diocletian at the turn of the fourth century AD, that today forms about half the old town of Split, Croatia. While it is referred to as a palace because of its intended use as the retirement residence of Diocletian, the term can be misleading as the structure is massive and more resembles a large fortress: about half of it was for Diocletian's personal use, and the rest housed the military garrison. Diocletian built the massive palace in preparation for his retirement on 1 May 305 AD. It lies in a bay on the south side of a short peninsula running out from the Dalmatian coast, four miles from Salona, the capital of the Roman province of Dalmatia. The terrain slopes gently seaward and is typical karst, consisting of low li...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 2. Plitvice Lakes National Park Plitvice Lakes National Park
    Plitvice Lakes National Park is one of the oldest and the largest national parks in Croatia. In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register.The national park was founded in 1949 and is situated in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia, at the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The important north-south road connection, which passes through the national park area, connects the Croatian inland with the Adriatic coastal region. The protected area extends over 296.85 square kilometres . About 90% of this area is part of Lika-Senj County, while the remaining 10% is part of Karlovac County. Each year, more than 1 million visitors are recorded. Entrance is subject to variable charges, up to 250 kuna or around €34 per adult per day in summer 2018.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 5. Morske Orgulje (Sea Organ) Zadar
    The Sea organ is an architectural sound art object located in Zadar, Croatia and an experimental musical instrument, which plays music by way of sea waves and tubes located underneath a set of large marble steps.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 7. Zlatni Rat Beach Bol
    The Zlatni Rat, often referred to as the Golden Cape or Golden Horn , is a spit of land located about 2 kilometres west from the harbour town of Bol on the southern coast of the Croatian island of Brač, in the region of Dalmatia. It extends southward into the Hvar Channel, a body of water in the Adriatic Sea between the islands of Brač and Hvar, which is home to strong currents. The landform itself is mostly composed of a white pebble beach, with a Mediterranean pine grove taking up the remainder. Zlatni Rat has been regularly listed as one of the top beaches in Europe. Its distinctive shape can be seen in many travel brochures, which made it one of the symbols of Croatian tourism.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 8. Island of Lokrum Dubrovnik
    The Elaphiti Islands or the Elaphites is a small archipelago consisting of several islands stretching northwest of Dubrovnik, in the Adriatic sea. The Elaphites have a total land area of around 30 square kilometres and a population of 850 inhabitants. The islands are covered with characteristic Mediterranean evergreen vegetation and attract large numbers of tourists during the summer tourist season due to their beaches and pristine scenery. The name comes from the Ancient Greek word for deer , which used to inhabit the islands in large numbers. Roman author Pliny the Elder was the first to mention the islands by the name Elaphiti Islands in his work Naturalis Historia, published in the 1st century.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 9. Pakleni Otoci Hvar
    The Pakleni or sometimes referred as Paklinski islands are located off the southwest coast of the island of Hvar, Croatia, opposite the entrance to the Hvar harbour. Usual local name is Škoji, which means Islands. The name is popularly translated as Hells' islands , but it originally derives from paklina, an archaic word, from which pakleni is derived. too. Paklina means tar, and in this case refers to the pine resin once used to coat ships that was harvested on these islands.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 10. Amphitheatre de Pula Pula
    The Pula Arena is the name of the amphitheatre located in Pula, Croatia. The Arena is the only remaining Roman amphitheatre to have four side towers and with all three Roman architectural orders entirely preserved. It was constructed in 27 BC – 68 AD and is among the six largest surviving Roman arenas in the World. A rare example among the 200 surviving Roman amphitheatres, it is also the best preserved ancient monument in Croatia. The amphitheatre is depicted on the reverse of the Croatian 10 kuna banknote, issued in 1993, 1995, 2001 and 2004.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 11. Trogir Historic Site Trogir
    Trogir is a historic town and harbour on the Adriatic coast in Split-Dalmatia County, Croatia, with a population of 10,818 and a total municipality population of 13,260 . The historic city of Trogir is situated on a small island between the Croatian mainland and the island of Čiovo. It lies 27 kilometres west of the city of Split. Since 1997, the historic centre of Trogir has been included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites for its Venetian architecture.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 15. Cycling Adriatic Samobor
    Downhill mountain biking is a genre of mountain biking practiced on steep, rough terrain that often features jumps, drops, rock gardens and other obstacles. Downhill bikes are heavier and stronger than other mountain bikes and feature front and rear suspension with over 8 inches of travel, to glide quickly over rocks and tree roots. In competitive races, a continuous course is defined on each side by a strip of tape. Depending on the format, riders have a single or double attempt to reach the finish line as fast as possible, while remaining between the two tapes designating the course. Riders must choose their line by compromising between the shortest possible line and the line that can be traveled at the highest speed. If a rider leaves the course by crossing or breaking the tape they mus...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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