This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

The Best Attractions In Afghanistan

x
Band-e-Amir National Park Farhad Amiri
Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam Justin Lim Chee Teong
Gawhar Shad Madrasa and Mausoleum
Cultural Landscape and Archaeological Remains of the Bamiyan Valley
Qargha Reservoir Qk Ahmadzai
Bagh-e Babur
National Museum of Afghanistan
Khwaja Abd Allah Ansari Shrine
Panjshir Mountains
Friday Mosque
Blue Mosque
Afghanistan , officially the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, is a landlocked country located within south-central Asia. Afghanistan is bordered by Pakistan in the south and east; Iran in the west; Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Tajikistan in the north; and in the far northeast, China. Its territory covers 652,000 square kilometers and much of it is covered by the Hindu Kush mountain range, which experience very cold winters. The north consists of fertile plains, whilst the south-west consists of deserts where temperatures can get very hot in summers. Kabul serves as the capital and its largest city. Human habitation in Afghanistan dates back to the Mid...
Continue reading...
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Filter Attractions:

The Best Attractions In Afghanistan

  • 1. Band-e-Amir National Park Bamyan
    Band-e Amir National Park is Afghanistan's first national park, located in the Bamyan Province. It is a series of six deep blue lakes separated by natural dams made of travertine, a mineral deposit. The lakes are situated in the Hindu Kush mountains of central Afghanistan at approximately 3000 m of elevation, west of the famous Buddhas of Bamiyan. They were created by the carbon dioxide rich water oozing out of the faults and fractures to deposit calcium carbonate precipitate in the form of travertine walls that today store the water of these lakes. Band-e Amir is one of the few rare natural lakes in the world which are created by travertine systems. The site of Band-e Amir has been described as Afghanistan's Grand Canyon, and draws thousands of tourists a year. The river is part of the sy...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 2. Minaret and Archaeological Remains of Jam Shahrak
    The Minaret of Jam is a UNESCO World Heritage Site in western Afghanistan. It is located in a remote and nearly inaccessible region of the Shahrak District, Ghor Province, next to the Hari River. The 65-metre or 62-metre high minaret was built around 1190 entirely of baked bricks and is famous for its intricate brick, stucco and glazed tile decoration, which consists of alternating bands of kufic and naskhi calligraphy, geometric patterns, and verses from the Qur'an. Since 2002, the minaret has remained on the list of World Heritage in Danger, under serious threat of erosion, and has not been actively preserved. In 2014, the BBC reported that the tower was in imminent danger of collapse.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 3. Cultural Landscape and Archaeological Remains of the Bamiyan Valley Bamyan
    The Buddhas of Bamiyan were 6th-century monumental statues of Gautam Buddha carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamyan valley in the Hazarajat region of central Afghanistan, 230 kilometres northwest of Kabul at an elevation of 2,500 metres . Built in 507 CE and 554 CE , the statues represented the classic blended style of Gandhara art. They were respectively 35 and 53 m tall.The main bodies were hewn directly from the sandstone cliffs, but details were modeled in mud mixed with straw, coated with stucco. This coating, practically all of which wore away long ago, was painted to enhance the expressions of the faces, hands, and folds of the robes; the larger one was painted carmine red and the smaller one was painted multiple colors.The lower parts of the statues' arms were constructed fro...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 4. National Museum of Afghanistan Kabul
    The National Museum of Afghanistan , also known as the Kabul Museum, is a two-story building located 9 km southwest of the center of Kabul in Afghanistan. As of 2014, the museum is under major expansion according to international standards, with a larger size adjoining garden for visitors to relax and walk around. The museum was once considered to be one of the world's finest.The museum's collection had earlier been one of the most important in Central Asia, with over 100,000 items dating back several millennia. With the start of the civil war in 1992, the museum was looted numerous times resulting in a loss of 70% of the 100,000 objects on display. Since 2007, a number of international organizations have helped to recover over 8,000 artifacts, the most recent being a limestone sculpture f...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 5. Friday Mosque Herat
    The Great Mosque of Herat , also known as the Masjid-i Jāmi‘ or Jami Msasjid of Herat, is a mosque in the city of Herat, in the Herat Province of north-western Afghanistan. It was built by the Ghurids, under the rule of the Sultan Ghiyath al-Din Muhammad Ghori, who laid its foundation in 1200 CE, and later extended by several rulers as Herat changed rulers down the centuries from the Timurids to the Safavids, Mughals and then the Uzbeks, all of whom supported the mosque. Though many of the glazed tiles have been replaced during subsequent periods, the Friday Mosque in Herat was given its present form during the closing years of the fifteenth century. Apart from numerous small neighborhood mosques for daily prayer, most communities in the Islamic world have a larger mosque, a congregatio...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 6. Qargha Reservoir Kabul
    Qargha is a dam and reservoir in Afghanistan near Kabul. The reservoir and its peripheral areas provide for recreation facilities such as boating, surfing, golfing, etc. and has a hotel on its bank. There is a fishery development in the reservoir supported by a hatchery on its banks. Irrigation and hydropower developments have also been planned from the stored waters of the reservoir.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 9. Khwaja Abd Allah Ansari Shrine Herat
    The Khwaja 'Abd Allah Ansari shrine, also known as Gazar Gah, is a funerary compound in Herat, Afghanistan, that houses the tomb of the Sufi mystic and saint Khwajah Abdullah Ansari, also known as the guardian pir of Herat. After his death in 1098, his tomb became a major Sunni pilgrimage center. Rebuilding of the shrine was commissioned by the Timurid ruler Shah Rukh in 1425-27.The shrine was built in a typical Timurid style. There have been several renovations, but during the Soviet invasion it fell into a bad state and has since deteriorated. The Aga Khan Trust for Culture has supported repairs to the shrine in recent years, under its Historic Cities Programme.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 10. Panjshir Mountains Panjshir Province
    The Panjshir Valley is a valley in north-central Afghanistan, 150 kilometres north of Kabul, near the Hindu Kush mountain range. It is divided by the Panjshir River. The valley is home to more than 940,000 people, including Afghanistan's largest concentration of ethnic Tajiks. In April 2004, it became the heart of the new Panjshir Province, having previously been part of Parwan Province.It was the site of the Panjshir offensives fought between the Democratic Republic of Afghanistan and the Soviets against the mujahideen during the Soviet–Afghan War from 1980 to 1985, when local commander Ahmad Shah Massoud successfully defended the valley from being taken. The valley again witnessed renewed fighting during the 1996–2001 civil war between the Taliban and the Northern Alliance under the ...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 11. Blue Mosque Mazar I Sharif
    The Blue Mosque is a mosque located in the center of Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan. The Seljuq dynasty sultan Ahmed Sanjar built the first known shrine at this location. It was destroyed or hidden under earthen embankment during the invasion of Genghis Khan in around 1220. In the 15th century, Sultan Husayn Mirza Bayqarah built the current Blue Mosque here. It is by far the most important landmark in Mazar-i-Sharif and it is believed that the name of city originates from this shrine. A site plan of the location made in the 1910s shows that there had earlier been a smaller walled precinct in the mosque, which was razed to create parklands later, although the portals to this precinct still remain as gateways for the shrine.Tombs of varying dimensions were added for a number of Afghan political...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Afghanistan Videos

Shares

x

Places in Afghanistan

x

Regions in Afghanistan

x

Near By Places

Menu