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The Best Attractions In France

Musee d'Orsay Dalker Walter
La plage Johann Dunoye
Place Massena amor diego
Louvre Museum James Park
Bayeux Dday Tours Normandy D Day Tours
Cathedrale Notre-Dame de Rouen Fernando Pesce
Eiffel Tower Brayan Mejia
Centre National d'Art et de Culture George Pompidou 陳惠玲
Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris Chang M K
Palais des Papes Fabien DESPREZ
Basilique Notre-Dame de la Garde Absolute Kings
Cape Canaille Dan Duquette
Chateau de Chambord william van poppel
Plage de Sylvabelle L é a a
American Cemetery & Memorial Marc Schraepen
France , officially the French Republic , is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The country's 18 integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 square kilometres and a total population of 67.3 million . France, a sovereign state, is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Pa...
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The Best Attractions In France

  • 1. Louvre Museum Paris
    The Louvre , or the Louvre Museum , is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the city's 1st arrondissement . Approximately 38,000 objects from prehistory to the 21st century are exhibited over an area of 72,735 square metres . In 2017, the Louvre was the world's most visited art museum, receiving 8.1 million visitors.The museum is housed in the Louvre Palace, originally built as the Louvre castle in the late 12th to 13th century under Philip II. Remnants of the fortress are visible in the basement of the museum. Due to the urban expansion of the city, the fortress eventually lost its defensive function and, in 1546, was converted by Francis I into the main residence of the Fre...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 2. Eiffel Tower Paris
    The Eiffel Tower is a wrought iron lattice tower on the Champ de Mars in Paris, France. It is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel, whose company designed and built the tower. Constructed from 1887–1889 as the entrance to the 1889 World's Fair, it was initially criticized by some of France's leading artists and intellectuals for its design, but it has become a global cultural icon of France and one of the most recognisable structures in the world. The Eiffel Tower is the most-visited paid monument in the world; 6.91 million people ascended it in 2015. The tower is 324 metres tall, about the same height as an 81-storey building, and the tallest structure in Paris. Its base is square, measuring 125 metres on each side. During its construction, the Eiffel Tower surpassed the Washington M...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 3. Musee d'Orsay Paris
    The Musée d'Orsay is a museum in Paris, France, on the Left Bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d'Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1914, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-Impressionist masterpieces in the world, by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Many of these works were held at the Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume prior to the museum's opening in 1986. It is one of the largest art museums in Europe. Musée d'Orsay had 3.177 million visitors in 2017.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 4. Basilique Notre-Dame de la Garde Marseille
    Notre-Dame de la Garde is a Catholic basilica in Marseille, France, and the city's best-known symbol. The site of a popular Assumption Day pilgrimage, it is the most visited site in Marseille. It was built on the foundations of an ancient fort at the highest natural point in Marseille, a 149 m limestone outcropping on the south side of the Old Port of Marseille. Construction of the basilica began in 1852 and lasted for 21 years. It was originally an enlargement of a medieval chapel, but was transformed into a new structure at the request of Father Bernard, the chaplain. The plans were made and developed by the architect Henri-Jacques Espérandieu. It was consecrated while still unfinished on 5 June 1864. The basilica consists of a lower church or crypt in the Romanesque style, carved from ...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 5. Cathedrale Notre-Dame de Rouen Rouen
    Rouen Cathedral is a Roman Catholic church in Rouen, Normandy, France. It is the see of the Archbishop of Rouen, Primate of Normandy. The cathedral is in the Gothic architectural tradition.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 6. Palais des Papes Avignon
    The Palais des Papes is an historical palace located in Avignon, southern France. It is one of the largest and most important medieval Gothic buildings in Europe. Once a fortress and palace, the papal residence was the seat of Western Christianity during the 14th century. Six papal conclaves were held in the Palais, leading to the elections of Benedict XII in 1334, Clement VI in 1342, Innocent VI in 1352, Urban V in 1362, Gregory XI in 1370 and Antipope Benedict XIII in 1394.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 7. Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris Paris
    Notre-Dame de Paris , also known as Notre-Dame Cathedral or simply Notre-Dame, is a medieval Catholic cathedral on the Île de la Cité in the fourth arrondissement of Paris, France. The cathedral is widely considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture. The innovative use of the rib vault and flying buttress, the enormous and colorful rose windows, and the naturalism and abundance of its sculptural decoration all set it apart from earlier Romanesque architecture.The cathedral was begun in 1160 and largely completed by 1260, though it was modified frequently in the following centuries. In the 1790s, Notre-Dame suffered desecration during the French Revolution when much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. Soon after the publication of Victor Hugo's ...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 8. Marineland Antibes
    The Marineland of Antibes is a theme park founded in 1970 by Roland de La Poype in Antibes , in the French Riviera. On 26 hectares it includes a marine zoological park with dolphinarium, a water park , a children's play park , a mini golf and a three-star hotel . It is the property of the Spanish multinational company Parques Reunidos, whose majority shareholder is the British investment fund Arle Capital Partners. The actual director is Arnaud Palu. It is one of the four French dolphinariums and one of the two European dolphinariums presenting orcas. With 1.2 million visitors in 2014, it's the most visited site of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region. The zoological park is one of the most visited in France. Since the 2010s, it is more and more criticised by the opponents to cetacean ca...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 11. Place Massena Nice
    The Place Masséna is a historic square in Nice, Alpes-Maritimes, France. It was named for André Masséna. Its layout was designed by Joseph Vernier in 1843-1844.The Place Masséna is the main square of the city. Before the Paillon River was covered over, the Pont-Neuf was the only practicable way between the old town and the modern one. The square was thus divided into two parts in 1824. With the demolition of the Masséna Casino in 1979, the Place Masséna became more spacious and less dense and is now bordered by red ochre buildings of Italian architecture. The recent rebuilding of the tramline gave the square back to the pedestrians, restoring its status as a real Mediterranean square. It is lined with palm trees and stone pines, instead of being the rectangular roundabout of sorts it...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 12. Chateau de Chambord Chambord
    The Château de Chambord at Chambord, Loir-et-Cher, France, is one of the most recognisable châteaux in the world because of its very distinctive French Renaissance architecture which blends traditional French medieval forms with classical Renaissance structures. The building, which was never completed, was constructed by King Francis I of France. Chambord is the largest château in the Loire Valley; it was built to serve as a hunting lodge for Francis I, who maintained his royal residences at the Château de Blois and Amboise. The original design of the Château de Chambord is attributed, though with some doubt, to Domenico da Cortona; Leonardo da Vinci may also have been involved. Chambord was altered considerably during the twenty-eight years of its construction , during which it was o...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 15. La plage Le Lavandou
    La Croix-Valmer is a commune in the Var department in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region in southeastern France.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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