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The Best Attractions In Italy

St. Peter's Basilica Yolanda Vela
Grano & Farina - Cooking School Grano & Farina - Cooking School In Trastevere
St. Mark's Square Ruslan Ismailov
Colosseum Ryan g
My Bus Italy Higuchi T.
Duomo di Milano Gatto NineNineNine
Pantheon emanuele cataldi
Fornillo Anna Carpentieri
Canal Grande Roberto Cavaliere
Paestum Ruins David ONeill
Trevi Fountain Shahid Siddiq
Scrovegni Chapel Lorenzo Pieve
Doge's Palace Erik Nykl
Azienda Agricola Di Giovanna Cantina Di Giovanna
Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore João Afonso Silva
Italy , officially the Italian Republic , is a country in Europe. Located in the heart of the Mediterranean Sea, Italy shares open land borders with France, Switzerland, Austria, Slovenia, San Marino, and Vatican City. Italy covers an area of 301,340 km2 and has a largely temperate seasonal and Mediterranean climate. With around 61 million inhabitants, it is the fourth-most populous EU member state and the most populous country in southern Europe. Due to its central geographic location in Europe and the Mediterranean, Italy has historically been home to a myriad of peoples and cultures. In addition to the various ancient Italian tribes and Italic peopl...
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The Best Attractions In Italy

  • 1. St. Peter's Basilica Vatican City
    The Papal Basilica of St. Peter in the Vatican , or simply St. Peter's Basilica , is an Italian Renaissance church in Vatican City, the papal enclave within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture and the largest church in the world. While it is neither the mother church of the Catholic Church nor the cathedral of the Diocese of Rome, St. Peter's is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic shrines. It has been described as holding a unique position in the Christian world and as the greatest of all churches of Christendom.Catholic tradition holds that the Basilica is the burial site of Saint Peter, chief among Jesus's Apostles and also the first Bishop of...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 2. Colosseum Rome
    The Colosseum or Coliseum , also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre , is an oval amphitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome, Italy. Built of travertine, tuff, and brick-faced concrete, it is the largest amphitheatre ever built. The Colosseum is situated just east of the Roman Forum. Construction began under the emperor Vespasian in AD 72, and was completed in AD 80 under his successor and heir Titus. Further modifications were made during the reign of Domitian . These three emperors are known as the Flavian dynasty, and the amphitheatre was named in Latin for its association with their family name . The Colosseum could hold, it is estimated, between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators, having an average audience of some 65,000; it was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such a...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 3. Pantheon Rome
    The Pantheon is a former Roman temple, now a church, in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus . It was completed by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD. Its date of construction is uncertain, because Hadrian chose not to inscribe the new temple but rather to retain the inscription of Agrippa's older temple, which had burned down.The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon's dome is still the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 4. St. Mark's Square Venice
    St Mark's Campanile is the bell tower of St Mark's Basilica in Venice, Italy, located in the Piazza San Marco. It is one of the most recognizable symbols of the city. The tower is 98.6 metres tall, and stands alone in a corner of St Mark's Square, near the front of the basilica. It has a simple form, the bulk of which is a fluted brick square shaft, 12 metres wide on each side and 50 metres tall, above which is a loggia surrounding the belfry, housing five bells. The belfry is topped by a cube, alternate faces of which show the Lion of St. Mark and the female representation of Venice . The tower is capped by a pyramidal spire, at the top of which sits a golden weathervane in the form of the archangel Gabriel. The campanile reached its present form in 1514. The current tower was reconstruct...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 5. Duomo di Milano Milan
    Piazza del Duomo is the main piazza of Milan, Italy. It is named after, and dominated by, the Milan Cathedral . The piazza marks the center of the city, both in a geographic sense and because of its importance from an artistic, cultural, and social point of view. Rectangular in shape, with an overall area of 17,000 m2 , the piazza includes some of the most important buildings of Milan , as well some of the most prestigious commercial activities, and it is by far the foremost tourist attraction of the city. While the piazza was originally created in the 14th century and has been gradually developing ever since , its overall plan, in its current form, is largely due to architect Giuseppe Mengoni, and dates back to the second half of the 19th century. The monumental buildings that mark its si...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 6. Scrovegni Chapel Padua
    The Scrovegni Chapel , is a small church, adjacent to the Augustinian monastery, the Monastero degli Eremitani in Padua, region of Veneto, Italy. The chapel and monastery are now part of the complex of the Museo Civico of Padua. The chapel contains a fresco cycle by Giotto, completed about 1305 and considered to be an important masterpiece of Western art.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 7. Canal Grande Venice
    The Grand Canal is a channel in Venice, Italy. It forms one of the major water-traffic corridors in the city. One end of the canal leads into the lagoon near the Santa Lucia railway station and the other end leads into the basin at San Marco; in between, it makes a large reverse-S shape through the central districts of Venice. It is 3.8 km long, and 30 to 90 m wide, with an average depth of five meters .
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 8. Doge's Palace Venice
    The Doge's Palace is a palace built in Venetian Gothic style, and one of the main landmarks of the city of Venice in northern Italy. The palace was the residence of the Doge of Venice, the supreme authority of the former Venetian Republic, opening as a museum in 1923. Today, it is one of the 11 museums run by the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 9. Paestum Ruins Paestum
    Paestum was a major ancient Greek city on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea in Magna Graecia . The ruins of Paestum are famous for their three ancient Greek temples in the Doric order, dating from about 600 to 450 BC, which are in a very good state of preservation. The city walls and amphitheatre are largely intact, and the bottom of the walls of many other structures remain, as well as paved roads. The site is open to the public, and there is a modern national museum within it, which also contains the finds from the associated Greek site of Foce del Sele. After its foundation by Greek colonists under the name of Poseidonia it was eventually conquered by the local Lucanians and later the Romans. The Lucanians renamed it to Paistos and the Romans gave the city its current name. As Pesto or Pa...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 11. Trevi Fountain Rome
    The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district in Rome, Italy, designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Giuseppe Pannini. Standing 26.3 metres high and 49.15 metres wide, it is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Federico Fellini's La Dolce Vita, the eponymous Three Coins in the Fountain, The Lizzie McGuire Movie, Sabrina Goes to Rome and Roman Holiday.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 12. Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore Florence
    Florence Cathedral, formally the Cattedrale di Santa Maria del Fiore , is the cathedral of Florence, Italy . It was begun in 1296 in the Gothic style to a design of Arnolfo di Cambio and was structurally completed by 1436, with the dome designed by Filippo Brunelleschi. The exterior of the basilica is faced with polychrome marble panels in various shades of green and pink, bordered by white, and has an elaborate 19th-century Gothic Revival façade by Emilio De Fabris. The cathedral complex, in Piazza del Duomo, includes the Baptistery and Giotto's Campanile. These three buildings are part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site covering the historic centre of Florence and are a major tourist attraction of Tuscany. The basilica is one of Italy's largest churches, and until the development of new ...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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