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The Best Attractions In The Balkans

Acropolis of Athens Cristian George
Plovdiv Trips PLOVDIV TRIPS
Plitvice Lakes National Park Sergey Kovalenko
Hagia Sophia Museum / Church (Ayasofya) Hussain Alshajjar
Island of Lokrum Severin Sabahi
Acropolis Museum Ancuta Coman
Diocletian's Palace L K
Spanjola Karel Rosler
Red Beach Stephane Maes
Lindos Beach Nikos Christodoulou
Dolmabahce Palace Octavian Barbu
The Balkans, also known as the Balkan Peninsula, or Southeast Europe is a geographic area in Europe with various definitions. The region takes its name from the Balkan Mountains that stretch from the Serbian-Bulgarian border to the Black Sea. The Balkan Peninsula is bordered by the Adriatic Sea on the northwest, the Ionian Sea on the southwest, the Aegean Sea in the south and southeast, and the Black Sea on the east and northeast. The northern border of the peninsula is variously defined. The highest point of the Balkans is Mount Musala, 2,925 metres , in the Rila mountain range.
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The Best Attractions In The Balkans

  • 1. Acropolis of Athens Athens
    The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient citadel located on a rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon. The word acropolis is from the Greek words ἄκρον and πόλις . Although the term acropolis is generic and there are many other acropoleis in Greece, the significance of the Acropolis of Athens is such that it is commonly known as The Acropolis without qualification. During ancient times it was known also more properly as Cecropia, after the legendary serpent-man, Cecrops, the first Athenian king. While there is evidence that the hill was inhabited as far back as the fourth millennium BC, it was Pericles in the fifth century BC who coordinated the...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 2. Acropolis Museum Athens
    The Acropolis Museum is an archaeological museum focused on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. The museum was built to house every artifact found on the rock and on the surrounding slopes, from the Greek Bronze Age to Roman and Byzantine Greece. It also lies over the ruins of a part of Roman and early Byzantine Athens. The museum was founded in 2003, while the Organization of the Museum was established in 2008. It opened to the public on 20 June 2009. Nearly 4,000 objects are exhibited over an area of 14,000 square metres. The Organization for the Construction of the new museum is chaired by Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Professor Emeritus of Archaeology, Dimitrios Pandermalis.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 3. Hagia Sophia Museum / Church (Ayasofya) Istanbul
    Hagia Sophia is the former Greek Orthodox Christian patriarchal cathedral, later an Ottoman imperial mosque and now a museum in Istanbul, Turkey. Built in 537 AD at the beginning of the Middle Ages, it was famous in particular for its massive dome. It was the world's largest building and an engineering marvel of its time. It is considered the epitome of Byzantine architecture and is said to have changed the history of architecture.From the date of its construction in 537 until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and the seat of the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople, except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted by the Fourth Crusaders to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was later converted into an Ottoman mosque from 29 May 1453 until ...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 4. Plitvice Lakes National Park Plitvice Lakes National Park
    Plitvice Lakes National Park is one of the oldest and the largest national parks in Croatia. In 1979, Plitvice Lakes National Park was added to the UNESCO World Heritage register.The national park was founded in 1949 and is situated in the mountainous karst area of central Croatia, at the border to Bosnia and Herzegovina. The important north-south road connection, which passes through the national park area, connects the Croatian inland with the Adriatic coastal region. The protected area extends over 296.85 square kilometres . About 90% of this area is part of Lika-Senj County, while the remaining 10% is part of Karlovac County. Each year, more than 1 million visitors are recorded. Entrance is subject to variable charges, up to 250 kuna or around €34 per adult per day in summer 2018.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 5. Goreme National Park Goreme
    Göreme , located among the fairy chimney rock formations, is a town in Cappadocia, a historical region of Turkey. It is in the Nevşehir Province in Central Anatolia and has a population of around 2,000 people.Former names of the town have been Korama, Matiana, Maccan or Machan, and Avcilar. When Göreme Valley nearby was designated an important tourist destination, a center for all tourism in Cappadocia, the name of the town was changed to Göreme for practical reasons. Among Göreme's historically important sites are Ortahane, Durmus Kadir, Yusuf Koc and Bezirhane churches, in addition to the richly decorated Tokali Kilise, the Apple Church, and a number of homes and pigeon houses carved straight into the rock formations in the town.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 6. Diocletian's Palace Split
    Diocletian's Palace is an ancient palace built for the Roman Emperor Diocletian at the turn of the fourth century AD, that today forms about half the old town of Split, Croatia. While it is referred to as a palace because of its intended use as the retirement residence of Diocletian, the term can be misleading as the structure is massive and more resembles a large fortress: about half of it was for Diocletian's personal use, and the rest housed the military garrison. Diocletian built the massive palace in preparation for his retirement on 1 May 305 AD. It lies in a bay on the south side of a short peninsula running out from the Dalmatian coast, four miles from Salona, the capital of the Roman province of Dalmatia. The terrain slopes gently seaward and is typical karst, consisting of low li...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 7. Delphi Delphi
    Delphi , formerly also called Pytho , is famous as the ancient sanctuary that grew rich as the seat of Pythia, the oracle who was consulted about important decisions throughout the ancient classical world. Moreover, the Greeks considered Delphi the navel of the world, as represented by the stone monument known as the Omphalos of Delphi. It occupies an impressive site on the south-western slope of Mount Parnassus, overlooking the coastal plain to the south and the valley of Phocis. It is now an extensive archaeological site with a small modern town of the same name nearby. It is recognised by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in having had a phenomenal influence in the ancient world, as evidenced by the rich monuments built there by most of the important ancient Greek city-states, demonstrati...
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 8. Island of Lokrum Dubrovnik
    The Elaphiti Islands or the Elaphites is a small archipelago consisting of several islands stretching northwest of Dubrovnik, in the Adriatic sea. The Elaphites have a total land area of around 30 square kilometres and a population of 850 inhabitants. The islands are covered with characteristic Mediterranean evergreen vegetation and attract large numbers of tourists during the summer tourist season due to their beaches and pristine scenery. The name comes from the Ancient Greek word for deer , which used to inhabit the islands in large numbers. Roman author Pliny the Elder was the first to mention the islands by the name Elaphiti Islands in his work Naturalis Historia, published in the 1st century.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 10. Pakleni Otoci Hvar
    The Pakleni or sometimes referred as Paklinski islands are located off the southwest coast of the island of Hvar, Croatia, opposite the entrance to the Hvar harbour. Usual local name is Škoji, which means Islands. The name is popularly translated as Hells' islands , but it originally derives from paklina, an archaic word, from which pakleni is derived. too. Paklina means tar, and in this case refers to the pine resin once used to coat ships that was harvested on these islands.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 12. Sultan Ahmed Mosque Istanbul
    The Sultan Ahmet Mosque is a historic mosque located in Istanbul, Turkey. A popular tourist site, the Sultan Ahmed Mosque continues to function as a mosque today; men still kneel in prayer on the mosque's lush red carpet after the call to prayer. The Blue Mosque, as it is popularly known, was constructed between 1609 and 1616 during the rule of Ahmed I. Its Külliye contains Ahmed's tomb, a madrasah and a hospice. Hand-painted blue tiles adorn the mosque’s interior walls, and at night the mosque is bathed in blue as lights frame the mosque’s five main domes, six minarets and eight secondary domes. It sits next to the Hagia Sophia, another popular tourist site.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 13. Lindos Beach Lindos
    Lindos is an archaeological site, a fishing village and a former municipality on the island of Rhodes, in the Dodecanese, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Rhodes, of which it is a municipal unit. The municipal unit has an area of 178.9 km2. It lies on the east coast of the island. It is about 50 km south of the town of Rhodes and its fine beaches make it a popular tourist and holiday destination. Lindos is situated in a large bay and faces the fishing village and small resort of Charaki.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 14. Basilica Cistern Istanbul
    The Basilica Cistern , is the largest of several hundred ancient cisterns that lie beneath the city of Istanbul , Turkey. The cistern, located 150 metres southwest of the Hagia Sophia on the historical peninsula of Sarayburnu, was built in the 6th century during the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian I.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
  • 15. Plaka Athens
    Pláka is the old historical neighborhood of Athens, clustered around the northern and eastern slopes of the Acropolis, and incorporating labyrinthine streets and neoclassical architecture. Plaka is built on top of the residential areas of the ancient town of Athens. It is known as the Neighborhood of the Gods due to its proximity to the Acropolis and its many archaeological sites.
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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